When Jean Nicolet

first stepped foot in

Wisconsin and concocted the

woefully unimaginative name, "Green Bay" (for

the color of the bay, you see), he assumed he was in

China. The year was 1634 and indigenous people

had occupied this land for thousands of years. An indigenous history is deeper ingrained in our land's culture than saying "ope" when you bump into

someone at the Piggly Wiggly or driving an

extra five miles past multiple gas

stations because "there's a Kwik Trip up here on the corner." It's important to remember this.

Popular history is often told from the perspective of the conquerors. Partner this with the widespread racial animosity that's back en vogue this decade and we've effectively wiped out the minimal progress that had been made on mandated indigenous education in schools.  

The above excerpt from Robert Bieder's Native American Communities in Wisconsin, 1600–1960: A Study of Tradition and Change  tells a minuscule piece of the story of the struggles of those who called the land that is Wisconsin home before anyone. But as an American state, Wisconsin is far from alone in this regard. In fact,

the imperial and heartless conquest of  Wisconsin native land is what makes Wisconsin more American than anything else

wisconsin first nations.png

Ghanaian independence from imperial Britain occurred in 1957. The first West African country to gain freedom from their imperialist conquerors, Ghana laid a blueprint of independence marked by a wave of pan-Africanism and independence movements. As such, it is important to understand the factors that led to Ghana's independence. In this original work, I analyze how Kwame Nkrumah and his Convention People's Party  were able to take the dream of independence and turn it from unfeasible to a certainty in only three years.

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