Sharing the Blame

As I prepared to write a fun post yesterday morning about winning a 100 person FanDuel tournament two nights ago, I learned of the 14 Miami Marlins testing positive for Covid-19. Eleven players, or 36% of the active roster, have now tested positive. Manager Don Mattingly and CEO Derek Jeter have assured us that it isn't their fault, both going out of their way to mention that it was only once they hit the road did the outbreak find a way to penetrate the impenetrable force that is the Miami Marlins roster. We've seen players test positive on other teams without full blown outbreaks, so I don't appreciate Mattingly and Jeter insinuating that they've done everything right and are just a bearer of bad luck.


I'm not sure what the reaction would have been had it been the New York Yankees or the Los Angeles Dodgers but I'm certain it would've been louder from everyone. I'm also certain those who carry the water for MLB, networks (ESPN) and writers (Jon Heyman) alike might be a little more concerned about competitive balance.


This whole season is dumb. I believe Major League Baseball and the Major League Baseball Players Association have a societal responsibility that they don't seem to take very seriously. We deserve baseball. But we deserve it safely. Remaining are the constant high-fives in the dugouts, the hugs, and the postgame walk-off celebrations. While I'll always err on the side of labor and especially with baseball note the long list of greed inspired handcuffing of the owners, pretending like the MLBPA does not bear a large portion (certainly not a majority) of blame for the outbreak on the Marlins is misguided.


I was pleased to see David Price comment on the situation after he opted out of playing this year. Those who have a financial interest in baseball being played have been transparently prepared to give MLB a pass on this, so it was nice to see that current star players were not interested in giving any such pass.